SEGMENT: FARMING DURING GREAT DEPRESSION, LOSS OF FARM & MIGRANT WORKERS

Irene McGuire>ISM Interviews M-Z>ISM Interviews M-Z, Segment 1

SEGMENT: FARMING DURING GREAT DEPRESSION, LOSS OF FARM & MIGRANT WORKERS,

duration 14:01
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FARMING DURING GREAT DEPRESSION
Parents never told children about loosing the farm. Parents did not talk about the farm. Did not like town milk. Parents would talk about loss of the farm later
LOSS OF FARM
Told immediate family but did not tell community. Peach crop failed 7 years in a row. Tried to sell farm but non one would pay for farm. Either sell it or banks will take it.
MARRIAGE
brother married girl who was friend of late husband. Oldest brother worked at husbands families packing house and recommended her. Dated in August proposed in November but had to be married before peaches in June or after peaches in August because no time to stop processing fruit.
FAMILY FARM
McGuires had been on farm for hundreds of years. Husband's grandfather was killed by run away carriage and wife took over. Husband and Irene took over farm from his father. Biggest change was Irene took over all the books. Change was gradual and granddad was in 60' or 70's when it changed. Bought farm legally and made payment to parents.
FARM BUSINESS
Freeze killed Peaches and corn just killed everything. Really hard on the economy of the area you live in. Townsfolk might not think you spend a lot but it affects the town because there are no workers to support town businesses.
MIGRANT WORKERS
Workers would come to Illinois in July and August from Arizona and MexiCounty Then would move on to Washington for Cherries. Had about 15 working on the farm but could increase to 200. Had to pick enough Bushels to make minimum wage; Always paid more than anyone else to retain workers; Came from Mexico and lived in Union County and Jackson County Migrant workers housing. Also had a population from St. Louis that would plant cotton one part of the year and pitch a tent on farm to pick peaches.