SEGMENT: FARMHOUSE, FARM EQUIPMENT, & FARMING METHODS

Marie Burch>UIS Collection B's>UIS Collection B's, Segment 6

SEGMENT: FARMHOUSE, FARM EQUIPMENT, & FARMING METHODS,

duration 15:04

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FAMILY
Tells a story that her grandfather at age four saw Lincoln when he dropped by the home (as he rode circuit) and her great grandfather taught him grammar. Mentions her then pregnant grandmother was widowed with six children and had to cope alone on a farm. Gives names of her grandmother's children.
FARMHOUSE
Describes the house she grew up in. In 1878 it had four large rooms in an l-shape. Had a dining room, parlor, and library. Her room was upstairs, which had to be heated with stoves burning wood or corn cobs. Cooked in a well-ventilated kitchen. Washing was sent out. Added a furnace and electricity after 1926. Put in a Delco light system of sixteen batteries that ran off a generator. Safer than kerosene with children around. Describes in heating from stove that burned wood, coal, & corncobs, to a furnace.
FARM EQUIPMENT
Father had a sulky plow with a seat and four horses to plow 160 acres. Later they got a gangplow (two plows in one). Explains how to guide a walking plow or cultivator. A harrow smoothed out the plowed dirt. Says oats are hard to grow. Have to plant early to avoid burning. Believes changes in weather (hotter) explains why farmers do not grow oats now. Changing weather means you had to work fast. Planted using a Cherro planter with a trip wire that dropped the oats, wheat, or corn. Describes how Cherro planter worked. Did not grow soybeans at that time.
FARMING METHODS
Describes shocking wheat into teepee-shaped shocks. Grain dried while in shocks for 2 to 3 weeks. Corn was left on the cob and dried in corn cribs. Oats do not spoil as easily. Refers to drying of grain as "going through the sweats."